Keystone XL Pipeline Defeat Will Likely Be Short-Lived


119744231The Keystone XL Pipeline bill was narrowly defeated Tuesday in the U.S. Senate. Indiana Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Kevin Brinegar offers his thoughts on the policy and the latest activity in Washington:

“Canada is going to continue to develop the oil sands and sell to other nations whether the U.S. allows the Keystone XL Pipeline or not. Whatever the impact that activity has on the environment, the activity is still going to happen. That’s the reality. Continued posturing by the Obama Administration and others amid calls from environmental groups isn’t going to change that.

Other countries are looking out for their energy futures. The U.S. needs to as well. Going forward with the Keystone XL Pipeline is an important part of the mix. It would strengthen and expand our already vital energy relationship with Canada. And sourcing more of our energy from a friendly, North American neighbor will help reduce our reliance on energy resources from less stable areas of the world.

Indiana is fortunate to have two senators – Dan Coats and Joe Donnelly – who understand the pipeline’s importance and have been staunch supporters of the project. It’s too bad the Senate, on the whole, couldn’t get past politics and do the right thing for our nation’s energy security. However, we look forward to early 2015 when this measure seems destined to finally pass the Senate and make its way to the President’s desk.

Background: The proposed Keystone XL project would construct a 1,700 mile pipeline to transport about 800,000 barrels a day of heavy crude oil from tar sand fields in Canada across the central U.S. to refineries on the Gulf Coast.

One thought on “Keystone XL Pipeline Defeat Will Likely Be Short-Lived

  1. Interesting argument as Indiana’s more than 10 operational corn ethanol production facilities provide more than 4,000 full time jobs but the Keystone XL Pipeline will only provide less than 1200 full time jobs (127 direct jobs and more than 1,000 indirect jobs) after construction is complete. All of the private landowners in Nebraska (private land makes up the majority of the pipeline) will have to give their land up for eminent domain to a foreign company – what gives a foreign company the right to ask a state for eminent domain?

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